Mitch Boretz

Name: Mitch Boretz

Job: Technical Communications Specialist for BCOE

A sign on a co-worker’s door reads: “Vote Mitch Boretz Governor.”

The word “hero” pops up a lot, too, when you ask Boretz’s colleagues to describe him.

Mitch Boretz, however, calls himself simply a “grant writer.”

So how did this grant writer achieve near-mythic status among his peers?

Simple: A lot of hard work, with great results.

Boretz, a technical communications specialist who’s been with UCR for 16 years, deals with all proposals for funding in the Bourns College of Engineering (BCOE). He finds grant opportunities, organizes budgets, sees that compliance issues are addressed and works diligently to write competitive and well-written proposals.

He cranks out more than 300 proposals per year  —  more than one proposal per work day! All of those proposals result in an average of $20 million in funding annually.

Boretz cites the research at UCR as part of his motivation.

“People here are so smart and creative, and are doing such important and interesting things. I love to be a part of that,” he said. “It’s all really cool stuff.”

To win those highly competitive grants, Boretz adopts an extremely focused approach.

“There are always agencies with funding and a need to marry that funding with people who have great ideas. We just have to convince the sponsor that UCR is the best choice,” said Boretz.

It’s evident that Boretz’s approach truly makes a difference; just last year, he managed to acquire $28.4 million in grants for BCOE.

But his mythic status isn’t just about the money he helps bring in. Boretz consistently organizes seminars for staff, faculty and students and teaches them how to find grants, how to apply and ways to successfully secure those grants through concise proposals.

Boretz might describe his fruitful career at UCR as fulfilling. A writer and editor, he received his undergraduate degree in journalism before working for several newspapers. And when the opportunity for writing proposals at UCR emerged, Mitch jumped at the chance.

“Newspapers keep getting smaller — and I’ve always liked writing but didn’t want to be a starving writer,” he said. “It’s nice to get paid.”

Plus, the prestige of UCR brings its own perks for Boretz.

“I always told myself that one day, I’d be working for a first-class institution … and now I’m here!” — Konrad Nagy

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