Free Public Lecture to Recount Dramatic Expeditions That Unearthed History of Life on Earth

Speaker Sean B. Carroll is an award-winning scientist, author, and educator, and a contributing science columnist for the New York Times

Photo shows Sean B. Carroll.

Sean B. Carroll is a professor of molecular biology and genetics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the vice president for science education of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Photo credit: Jeff Miller, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

RIVERSIDE, Calif. — The award-winning biologist and New York Times contributing science columnist Sean B. Carroll will deliver the John A. and Betty C. Moore Science as a Way of Knowing lecture at the University of California, Riverside on Feb. 11, 2013.

The lecture, titled “Remarkable Creatures: Epic Adventures in the Search for the Origins of Species,” starts at 5:30 p.m. in Rooms C, D, and E in the University of California Extension Center (UNEX), 1200 University Ave., Riverside.  The lecture will end at 7 p.m. and include a question-and-answer period. Admission and parking are free.

In his talk, Carroll, a professor of molecular biology and genetics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the vice president for science education of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, will discuss the epic journeys of the pioneering naturalists that unearthed the history of life on our planet, show how their contributions inform our current understanding of the natural world, and recount the important discoveries in two centuries of natural history, including breakthroughs that are making headlines today.

Carroll is the author of “Remarkable Creatures: Epic Adventures in the Search for the Origins of Species” (2009, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), “The Making of the Fittest” (2006, W.W. Norton) and of “Endless Forms Most Beautiful: The New Science of Evo Devo” (2005, W.W. Norton). His monthly feature for the New York Times Science Times is called “Remarkable Creatures.”

He also is the author of the student text “Into The Jungle: Great Adventures in the Search for Evolution” (2008, Pearson, Benjamin Cummings); co-author with Jen Grenier and Scott Weatherbee of the textbook “From DNA to Diversity: Molecular Genetics and the Evolution of Animal Design”(second ediiton, 2005; Blackwell Scientific); and co-author with Anthony Griffiths, UC Riverside’s Susan Wessler, and John Doebley of the textbook “Introduction to Genetic Analysis” (tenth edition, 2011, W.H. Freeman and Co.). He is also the author or co-author of more than 100 scientific papers.

A leader in evolutionary developmental biology (“evo-devo”), Carroll is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has received the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Life Science, National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, the Shaw Scientist Award of the Milwaukee Foundation, the Stephen Jay Gould Prize for promoting the public understanding of evolution, the Viktor Hamburger Outstanding Educator Prize, the Distinguished Service Award from the National Association of Biology Teachers, and numerous honorary lectureships. He was named one of America’s most promising leaders under 40 by TIME Magazine in 1994.

Carroll earned his bachelor’s degree in biology at Washington University in St. Louis, his doctoral degree in immunology at Tufts Medical School, and did postdoctoral research at the University of Colorado-Boulder. He received an honorary Doctor of Science from the University of Minnesota in 2009.

“Now, more than ever, we are in need of prominent scientists who can clearly explain both the process and the consequences of our work to the public,” said Richard Cardullo, a professor of biology at UC Riverside, who invited Carroll to campus.  “Sean Carroll is one of those rare individuals who does precisely that.”

The John A. and Betty C. Moore Science as a Way of Knowing lecture series was established in 1997 to bring outstanding scientists to campus who are especially recognized for their contributions to society and especially to science education. John Moore was a professor in the Department of Biology from 1969 until his death in 2002. He was widely recognized for his contributions to the teaching of science. He authored “Science as a Way of Knowing,” the seven-volume series still used by scientists around the world for teaching from the high school to the graduate school level.

For more information about the lecture series or the talk by Carroll, please call (951) 827-5903.

Media Contact


Tel: (951) 827-6050
E-mail: iqbal@ucr.edu
Twitter: UCR_Sciencenews

Additional Contacts

Information about the lecture
Tel: (951) 827-5903
E-mail: carol.lerner@ucr.edu

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