Five UCR researchers named Thomson Reuters “Highly Cited Researchers 2014”

Five researchers at UC Riverside have been named Thomson Reuters “Highly Cited Researchers 2014.” They are: Robert C. Haddon, a distinguished professor of chemistry as well as chemical and environmental engineering; Yadong Yin, a professor of chemistry; Wei Ren, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering; Roya Bahreini, an assistant professor of atmospheric science; and Julia Bailey-Serres, a professor of genetics.  Yin is highly cited in two categories: chemistry and materials science.
Highly Cited Researchers 2014 (highlycited.com) represents some of the world’s leading scientific minds. More than 3,000 researchers earned the distinction by writing the greatest number of reports officially designated by Essential Science Indicators℠ as Highly Cited Papers—ranking among the top 1 percent most cited for their subject field and year of publication, earning them the mark of exceptional impact.
Once researchers achieve the “Highly Cited Researcher” designation, they retain the status forever.

Wyman’s Research on Lignin Valorization Published in Science

Charles Wyman, the Ford Motor Company Chair in Environmental Engineering at UC Riverside’s Center for Environmental Research and Technology and professor in the Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department of BCOE, is one of 16 authors of the paper, “Lignin Valorization: Improving Lignin Processing in the Biorefinery,” which was published in the May 16 issue of Science.

‘Nature Biotechnology’ Cover Photographed by UCR’s Toni Siebert

The photo appearing on the cover of the July 2014 issue of Nature Biotechnology was taken by UCR’s Toni Siebert, a museum scientist in the Department of Botany and Plant Sciences.

The photo appearing on the cover of the July 2014 issue of Nature Biotechnology was taken by UCR’s Toni Siebert, a museum scientist in the Department of Botany and Plant Sciences.

The photo appearing on the cover of the July 2014 issue of Nature Biotechnology was taken by UCR’s Toni Siebert, a museum scientist in the Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, who works in the lab of Tracy Kahn, the curator of UCR’s Citrus Variety Collection.  The cover photo is associated with a research paper in the July issue — “Sequencing of diverse mandarin, pummelo and orange genomes reveals complex history of admixture during citrus domestication” – in which the authors sequence and compare citrus genomes.  The lab of Mikeal Roose, a professor of genetics at UCR, contributed one of the citrus genome sequences analyzed in  the paper.

UCR undergraduate students to work in Ludwig Bartels lab

UCR undergraduate students Sahar Naghibi, Gretel von Son Palacio, Tom Empante and Daniel Liu have received STARnet fellowships to do work this summer in the laboratory of Ludwig Bartels, a professor of chemistry.  The fellowships were awarded to the students by the Semiconductor Research Corp., the trade organization of the semiconductor industry.
STARnet is a collaborative network of Semiconductor Technology Advanced Research centers. Each STARnet center is a team of U.S. universities that conducts precompetitive exploratory research on semiconductor, system and design technology critical to the U.S. microelectronics and defense industries. Bartels is currently a STARnet participating faculty member.
Stajich Wins 2014 Alexopoulos Prize

Scanlon and Raschke Attend International Symposium

Thomas Scanlon, professor and department chair of comparative literature and foreign language, and Wendy Raschke, lecturer and director of the Classics Program, recently attended the Third International Scholars’ Symposium on “Sports, Society, and Culture in Ancient Olympia,” from July 9-12 in Olympia, Greece.

The symposium was organized by the International Olympic Academy (IOA), in cooperation with Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies, and hosted scholars from around the world and more than a hundred professors from Greek and American universities.

The theme of the symposium, “Revisiting the Past, Understanding the Present,” established comparisons between Antiquity and the modern Olympic tradition and used the work of various scholars to show the significance of the past in dealing with contemporary challenges.

At the symposium, Scanlon and Raschke gave lectures and workshops to graduates and undergraduates from Greece and visited the site of the original ancient Olympics. In addition, Scanlon will also publish a two-volume edition of articles, titled “Sport in the Greek and Roman World,” in the fall.

Top of Page