New Faculty at the College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences

Seventeen new faculty members join CHASS this year

Marissa Brookes, assistant professor of political science

Marissa Brookes

Marissa Brookes

Brookes earned her Ph.D. in political science from Northwestern University in 2013. Her research investigates the relationship between labor and capital in the context of economic globalization, the impact of labor transnationalism on national industrial relations and labor market institutions, and the role of global production networks, national institutional frameworks, and social relations in shaping workers’ power. She teaches courses in international relations, comparative politics, and international political economy.

 Cecilia Cheung, assistant professor of psychology

Cecilia Cheung

Cecilia Cheung

Cheung received her doctorate in psychology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on children’s development across cultures, with a special emphasis on how the environment shapes children’s motivation and achievement in school. Her recent research examines how teachers’ relationships with children in the classroom may influence children’s achievement in 54 countries varying in national individualism.

 Charmaine Craig, assistant professor of creative writing

Charmaine Craig

Charmaine Craig

Craig studied literature at Harvard University and received her M.F.A. in fiction from UC Irvine.  Her first novel, “The Good Men,” published by Riverhead Books (Penguin), was a widely reviewed national bestseller and translated into six foreign languages.  Craig is interested in the relationship between fiction, fact, and freedom, and brings to the classroom secondary areas of expertise in historical fiction and narratology.

 Ashon Crawley, assistant professor of ethnic studies

Ashon Crawley

Ashon Crawley

Crawley earned his doctoral degree from Duke University in the English department with a certificate in African and African-American studies. His research and teaching experiences are in the areas of black studies, performance theory and sound studies, philosophy and theology, black feminist and queer theories.



 William Dunlop, assistant professor of psychology

William Dunlop

William Dunlop

Dunlop received his doctorate in developmental, personality, and social psychology from the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, Canada. His research explores the ways in which people make sense of themselves and the lives they lead. Dunlop is the recent award recipient of the Society for Research on Identity Formation’s dissertation award, and his research has appeared in scholarly outlets including Health Psychology, the Journal of Personality, and the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

 Laura Harris, assistant professor of media and cultural studies

Laura Harris

Laura Harris

Harris received her doctorate in social and cultural analysis from New York University.  Her research areas are hemispheric American studies, African diaspora studies, gender and sexuality studies, and visual, performance and literary studies. She is completing a manuscript on the Trinidadian writer C. L. R. James and the Brazilian artist Hélio Oiticica and the experiments each participated in while living in the United States. She is also beginning a manuscript on the exploration of movement and tenuous forms of habitation in performance and film in postwar New York.

 Dongwon Lee, acting assistant professor of economics

Dongwon Lee

Dongwon Lee

Lee did his graduate training at the University of Washington and will receive his Ph.D. in June 2014. His fields of research and teaching interests are international finance and macroeconomics. Lee’s research focuses on understanding the potential economic determinants that drive various exchange rate responses of major commodity exporters to fluctuations of global commodity prices.

 David Lloyd, distinguished professor of English

David Lloyd

David Lloyd

Lloyd has worked primarily on Irish culture and on postcolonial and cultural theory.  His most recent books in that field are “Irish Times: Temporalities of Modernity” (Field Day Books, 2008) and “Irish Culture and Colonial Modernity: The Transformation of Oral Space” (Cambridge University Press, 2011).   He recently completed a book on Samuel Beckett and the visual arts. He is also a poet and playwright: his book “Arc & Sill: Poems 1979-2009” was published by Shearsman Books in the U.K. and New Writers’ Press, Dublin, 2012. His play, “The Press,” premiered at Liverpool Hope University in 2010.

 Yunhee Min, assistant professor of art

Min received an M.A. in design studies from the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University. Her primary practice is in painting and site installations. She is interested in painting as material practice (of studio) as well as in spatial experiences of architecture and built environments. She sees her work as experiments in abstraction, color, and gesture that generate new spatialities. In her installations, she explores new materials and building technologies to bring about subtle spatial perceptions. She is also a co-founder of Silvershed, an artist-run space in New York City.

 Nicholas Mitchell, assistant professor of ethnic studies

Nicholas Mitchell

Nicholas Mitchell

Mitchell’s research and teaching explore the social arrangements of knowledge and the ways that knowledge and its institutional practices arrange social worlds. He is working on a book tentatively titled “Disciplinary Matters: Black Studies, Women’s Studies, and the Neoliberal University,” that places the institutional projects of black studies and women’s studies not at the margins but the heart of the consolidation of the post-civil rights U.S. university.

Fred Moten, professor of English

Fred Moten

Fred Moten

Moten received his Ph.D. in English from UC Berkeley. He is a student of Afro-diasporic social and cultural life with teaching, research and creative interests in poetry, performance studies and critical theory. His books include “In the Break,” “Hughson’s Tavern,” “B. Jenkins,” “The Undercommons” (with his frequent collaborator Stefano Harney) and “The Feel Trio. “

 Hiroki Nishamura, assistant  professor of economics

Hiroki Nishamura

Hiroki Nishamura

Nishamura received his Ph.D. from New York University in 2013. His research interest lies on microeconomics through theoretical and mathematical methods. In particular, his recent research focuses on behavioral welfare economics, and it investigates decision maker’s welfare without making idealized assumptions such as all decision makers are fully rational. He is currently working on applications of behavioral welfare economics in policy evaluations and social management.

 J.P. Park, assistant professor of art history

J.P. Park

J.P. Park

Park has previously taught at Columbia University and the University of Colorado at Boulder. He is working on a new book project, “The Age of Vicissitudes: Transformations and Negotiations in the Art of the Late Chosŏn Korea (1650–1850),” in which he will provide the first in-depth study of early modern Korea’s art-making in the wider web of the era’s socio-cultural dynamics.

 Megan Robbins, assistant professor of psychology

Megan Robbins

Megan Robbins

Robbins received her doctorate in psychology from the University of Arizona. Her research focuses on understanding how people’s daily social interactions are related to health and well-being. Her ultimate goal is to understand the implications of mundane interactions and automatic behaviors to elucidate effective strategies and interventions people can naturally incorporate into their daily lives.

 Sarita Echavez See, associate professor of media and cultural studies

Sarita Echavez See

Sarita Echavez See

See received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 2001. Her research and teaching interests range across the interdisciplines of empire and postcolonial studies, critical race studies, and minoritized art, media, and performance. She is founder and executive director of the nonprofit, Web-based organization the Center for Art and Thought.

Joel Smith, assistant professor of dance

Joel Smith

Joel Smith

Smith received his M.F.A. in experimental choreography from UCR. His research and teaching interests include developing compositional strategies for creating critical dance as a form of performance, and challenging representations of gender and sexuality embedded in male/female partnerships. He is the co-artistic director of casebolt and smith, a contemporary dance/theater duet company, with artistic partner Liz Casebolt. Through collaboration and a shared sense of humor, the two combine speaking, singing, gesture, contemporary movement vocabularies and improvisational structures to demystify how dances are made.

 Travis Stanton, associate professor of anthropology

Travis Stanton

Travis Stanton

Stanton received his Ph.D. in anthropology from Southern Methodist University. His training and research interests are in Mesoamerican archaeology with a focus on the Maya region. He has published and edited several books as well as numerous journal articles on topics including the origins of Maya civilization, landscape archaeology, cultural memory, ancient warfare, and ceramic technology. He currently co-directs a project in central Yucatan, Mexico, that is researching the nature of social integration from the Paleoindian through the Early Colonial periods.

Media Contact


Tel: (951) 827-2645
E-mail: lille.bose@ucr.edu

Archived under: Inside UCR, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Top of Page