Ariel Dinar a Panelist at a Climate Change Forum

Ariel Dinar

Ariel Dinar

California is the nation’s largest agricultural producer, with an output of $44.7 billion last year. Because it plays such a critical role in the state’s economy, agriculture also is the “canary in the coal mine,” signaling an early warning of the likely impacts of climate change.

On May 19, a forum in Sacramento titled “Climate Change: Challenges to California’s Agriculture and Natural Resources” and coordinated by the University of California Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, focused on the future impact of climate change on California’s agriculture and natural resources.

UC Riverside’s Ariel Dinar, the director of the Water Science and Policy Center and professor of environmental economics, was a panelist at the forum. The one-day forum brought together leading economists, analysts, scientists and policymakers from the University of California, state government, nonprofits and the private sector.

Gov. Jerry Brown addressed the forum.

The Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics supports research in agricultural and resource economics on the Berkeley, Davis and Riverside campuses of the University of California.

Conway Paper Published

A paper co-authored by Melissa Conway, head of Special Collections & University Archives in the UCR Libraries, was published in the April issue of Manuscripta: A Journal for Manuscript Research.

The paper, “The Directory of Institutions in the United States and Canada with Pre-1600 Manuscript Holdings — From its Origins to the Present, and its Role in Tracking the Migration of Manuscripts in North American Repositories,” describes the production of “The Directory of Institutions in the United States and Canada with Pre-1600 Manuscript Holdings.”

Conway and paper co-author Lisa Fagin Davis, acting executive director of the Medieval Academy of America in Cambridge, Massachusetts, co-authored “The Directory of Institutions in the United States and Canada with Pre-1600 Manuscript Holdings,” a survey of the almost 500 institutions —many of them public libraries — holding 45,000 pre-1600 manuscripts.

Manuscripta is published biannually by the Knights of Columbus Vatican Film Library in the Pius XII Memorial Library at St. Louis University. Published since 1957, the journal features articles and reviews on medieval and Renaissance manuscript production, distribution, reception, and transmission.

 

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