UCR Graduate Students Present Research to the Community

UCR graduate students Chris Emerling (center) and Zoe Thompson (right) show different mammalian skulls to Vivian Mayen.  Photo credit: Layla Hiramatsu, UC Riverside.

UCR graduate students Chris Emerling (center) and Zoe Thompson (right) show different mammalian skulls to Vivian Mayen. Photo credit: Layla Hiramatsu, UC Riverside.

Riverside families had an opportunity to learn about some of the new findings in biology on Sunday, March 1, at the Riverside Metropolitan Museum when UC Riverside graduate students co-hosted an outreach event with the Met Museum as part of the downtown Riverside “First Sundays” series.

About 15 grad students presented research to the community through booths and talks, and highlighted topics such as spiders and their silk; lizard locomotion and biomechanics; hummingbird song and courting dances; the Santa Ana River ecosystem and organisms; and skull morphology. The students had live lizards, fish, and spiders, along with many enjoyable activities for kids.

“Our goal was to show that cutting-edge research happens right here in Riverside and to encourage more science curiosity and literacy in the Inland Empire,” said Layla Hiramatsu, a Ph.D. student in the Evolution, Ecology & Organismal Biology Graduate Program, who served as the outreach coordinator. “The event was a fun occasion for parents and kids to get to know their community and talk with scientists, especially young scientists in graduate school.”

UCR Researchers Find That Glass Coating Improves Battery Performance

Mihri and Cengiz Ozkan, both professors in the Bourns College of Engineering.

Mihri and Cengiz Ozkan, both professors in the Bourns College of Engineering.

Researchers in the UCR Bourns College of Engineering have investigated a strategy to prevent lithium polysulfides dissolving in lithium-sulfur batteries’ electrolyte and traveling to the opposite electrode permanently, causing the batter’s capacity to decrease over its lifetime. Ph.D. students in Cengiz Ozkan’s and Mihri Ozkan’s research groups combated this “polysulfide shuttling” phenomenon by creating nano-sized sulfure particles, and coating them in silica (SiO2), otherwise known as glass.

The work is outlined in a paper, “SiO2 – Coated Sulfur Particles as a Cathode Material for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries,” was published online in the journal Nanoscale.

Read more at: http://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/27531

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