UCR Professor Receive Harvard University’s Proskouriakoff Award

Karl A. Taube

Karl A. Taube

Karl A. Taube, professor and chair of the Department of Anthropology, is the recipient of Harvard University’s Proskouriakoff Award and presented the Tatiana Proskouriakoff Award Lecture on Nov. 10 at the university’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology.

The award, named for the Peabody Museum scholar who laid the foundation for deciphering Maya hieroglyphics, recognizes scholars who have contributed significantly to understanding ancient Mesoamerican writing and art. The Peabody Museum is among the oldest archaeological and ethnographic museums in the world.

Taube’s lecture, “Ehecatl: the Mythic and Cultural Origins of a Mesoamerican Wind God,” traced the origin of one of the most curious deities of the Aztec pantheon from eastern Mesoamerica to Central Mexico. Ehecatl is a duck-billed deity embodying ethereal concepts such as rain-bringing wind and the breath of life. The better-known Quetzalcoatl, who also embodies the same concepts of wind, is represented as a quetzal-plumed rattlesnake.

UCR History Chair Elected Vice President/President of Society for Reformation Research

Randolph C. Head

Randolph C. Head

Randolph C. Head, professor and chair of the Department of History, has been elected vice president/president-elect of the Society for Reformation Research. He will serve as vice president in 2016 and 2017, and president in 2018 and 2019.

The society, founded in 1947, is a North American scholarly organization that promotes research, writing, and dialogue on all aspects related to the Protestant and Catholic Reformations and other aspects of religious life in the early modern era. The organization sponsors a variety of sessions each year at both the Sixteenth Century Studies Conference and the International Congress on Medieval Studies. It also co-sponsors the journal Archive for Reformation History, now in its 106th year of publication.

Two UCR Creative Writing Professors Nominated for Dublin International Literary Award

Laila Lalami

Laila Lalami

Jane Smiley

Jane Smiley

Laila Lalami and Jane Smiley, both professors of creative writing, have been longlisted for the Dublin International Literary Award. Lalami was nominated for “The Moor’s Account” (Pantheon, 2014), and Smiley was nominated for “Some Luck” (Alfred A. Knopf, 2014).

Among the 160 books nominated by libraries worldwide, the novels by Lalami and Smiley are among 44 by American authors longlisted for the award. Sponsored by the Dublin City Council, the award is presented for works of fiction published in English and carries a prize of €100,000 (approximately $107,000). The shortlist will be published on April 12, 2016, and the winner announced on June 9.

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