Research and Economic Development Office Hosting Informal Meetings on Various Research Topics

The first informal collaboation meeting hosted by the Office of Research and Economic Development focused on the theme of diabetes. Held on Feb. 8, it was hosted by Michael Pazzani, the vice chancellor for research and economic development (from bottom left, clockwise); Vagelis Hristidis Christidis, an associate professor of computer science and engineering; Emily Abbott, director of corporate and strategic partnerships; Katherine Sweeney, an associate professor of psychology; James Borneman, a professor of plant pathology and microbiology; Kevin Esterling, a professor of political science and public policy; and Declan McCole, an associate professor of biomedical sciences.

The first informal collaboration meeting hosted by the Office of Research and Economic Development was themed around diabetes. Held on Feb. 8, it was hosted by Michael Pazzani, the vice chancellor for research and economic development (bottom left). Also in attendance were (clockwise) Vagelis Hristidis Christidis, an associate professor of computer science and engineering; Emily Abbott, director of corporate and strategic partnerships; Katherine Sweeney, an associate professor of psychology; James Borneman, a professor of plant pathology and microbiology; Kevin Esterling, a professor of political science and public policy; and Declan McCole, an associate professor of biomedical sciences.

The Office of Research and Economic Development is hosting informal meetings on a variety of research topics aimed at getting faculty on campus to come together, learn about each other’s research, collaborate on projects, and explore funding opportunities.  The first such meeting, which took place Feb. 8, focused on diabetes.  A meeting on huanglongbing, the plant disease that is fatal to citrus, took place Feb. 9.  Another meeting on water is scheduled for March 7. To gain more information about these meetings or suggest research topics, please contact the Office of Research and Economic Development.

Anthropologist’s Book a Best Seller in South Korea

Sang-Hee Lee

Sang-Hee Lee

Published in September 2015, “Human Origins” by UCR paleoanthropologist Sang-Hee Lee was named Science Book of the Year by SisaIN, an influential Korean media outlet, and has been on the respected Kyobo Bookstore’s Best Seller list since publication.

Written in Korean, “Human Origins” (ScienceBooks, Seoul, Korea) discusses human evolutionary history, but from the perspective of curious lay readers. Each chapter focuses on a question such as: Were there cannibals among primitive people? What is the price of having a big brain? How did we become meat eaters? Why do so many humans become lactose-intolerant in adulthood?

Now in its fourth printing with nearly 10,000 copies sold – an enormous amount for a science book in South Korea – the 352-page book is a collection of 22 essays Lee wrote about human evolution for a leading science magazine in Korea over a two-year period. Lee shared co-authorship of the book with the magazine’s award-winning editor, Shin-Young Yoon, who edited her essays to appeal to a general audience. Discussions have begun with publishers in Japan and Taiwan to translate it for publication there.

Read more about Lee and her best-selling book.

Joseph N. Sanberg Provides Scholarships, Mentoring for Seven UCR Public Policy Graduate Students

Entrepreneur, investor and Orange County native Joseph N. Sanberg has funded seven two-year graduate student scholarships in the UCR School of Public Policy.

The scholarships are funded through Sanberg’s quarter-million-dollar investment in the school and will be named after his maternal grandfather, Abraham “Manny” Rice, a successful Orange County businessman who was the youngest of 15 children born to Ukrainian immigrants in Chicago.

Manny Rice lived by a simple code: Work hard. Take risks. Be humble. Give back. Face the unknown with courage. This code summarizes what Sanberg hopes these Master of Public Policy students will use to transform the Inland Empire, the state and the nation.

For Sanberg, funding the Abraham Rice Scholars is only the first step. He intends to meet with the scholarship recipients throughout their time at UCR, hoping to “provoke them to think about ideas and opportunities in new and different ways about what they can do in their lives, to challenge conventional wisdom in all forms, and hold them to account to stay in the region and make this an exciting place in Southern California.”

Read more about Sanberg’s involvement with the School of Public Policy.

ECE Professor Korotkov Receives $1.1 Million Grant Toward Quantum Computing Research

Alexander Korotkov

Alexander Korotkov

A new $1.1 million grant from the Army Research Office (ARO) was received by Alexander Korotkov, professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, for research developing a theory of continuous quantum measurement, applied to readout of qubits in a superconducting quantum computer. The results of his research will help to make the dream of quantum computing a reality.

The grant is part of a $9.7 million project led by an experimental team at UC Berkeley and allows Korotkov to continue building on a 15-year legacy of quantum computing research that produces quality results. In particular, in 2014 his group members published 17 journal papers — including two papers in Nature — and 12 journal papers have been published this past year.

Vice Provost Brint to speak to National Academy of Sciences Committee on ‘The Future of the Research University’

Steven Brint

Steven Brint

Vice Provost Steven Brint will speak to the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Science, Technology and the Law in a plenary session at its next meeting on March 10 in Newport Beach. Brint will participate in a panel on “The Future of the Research University.” He will discuss problems facing research universities, including state disinvestment, quality of programs, increasing divergence of science and humanities, tensions between interdisciplinary and disciplinary development, and the effectiveness of new technologies as a complement to or substitute for face-to-face instruction. The other panelists will be former Columbia University Provost Jonathan Cole and Arizona State University President Michael Crow.

Established in 1998, the committee brings together the science and engineering community and the legal community to explore pressing issues, improve communication and help resolve issues between the two communities. The committee meets twice a year to discuss critical issues at the interface of science, technology, and the law; to promote understanding; and to develop imaginative approaches to solving problems of mutual concern. Many talks from previous plenary sessions have led to creation of National Research Council task forces to produce recommendations for changes in federal policy.

Dept. of Philosophy to Host Southwest Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy

The UCR Department of Philosophy will host the ninth annual meeting of the Southwest Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy on Saturday, Feb. 27. Following the model of similar seminars around the U.S. and Canada, the Southwest Seminar was formed to foster interaction among scholars who work on various topics in the history of early modern philosophy, according to Adam Harmer, assistant professor of philosophy and conference organizer.

The seminar begins at 9 a.m. at the Center for Ideas and Society, located in College Building South. The event is free, but registration is required and may be made by emailing adam.harmer@ucr.edu.

Keynote speaker Maria Rosa Antognazza of King’s College London will discuss “Philosophy and Science in Leibniz.” G.W. Leibniz was a prominent, 17th century German mathematician and philosopher known for his optimism and advocacy of rationalism.

Also speaking at the seminar are: Andreea Mihali, Wilfrid Laurier University, “Self-Creation in Descartes”; Chloe Armstrong, Lawrence University, “Necessitarianism in Leibniz’s ‘Theodicy’”; Christopher Fruge, University of Houston, “Shared Parts and Political Authority: Groups as Individuals in Spinoza”; Ericka Tucker, Marquette University, “Flourishing without the Good: Hobbes on Eudaimonism”; and Jason Fisette, University of Nevada-Reno, “Hume’s Analogy of True Judgments in Colors and Morals.”

A pre-seminar colloquium on Friday, Feb. 26, at 3 p.m. in Humanities 1500 will feature Donald Rutherford from UC San Diego discussing “Wisdom for Moderns.”

The seminar is sponsored by the Department of Philosophy and supported by the Center for Ideas and Society.

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