UCR Research Featured in ‘Chemical and Engineering News’ Magazine

A research study led by Nosang V. Myung, professor and department chair of chemical and environmental engineering in UCR’s Bourns College of Engineering has been named one of the “Top 10 Sustainable Chemistry Papers” in the June 6 edition of Chemical and Engineering News, which is published by the American Chemical Society. The top 10 papers comprise the most-read papers in sustainable or green chemistry from Environmental Science & Technology, Environmental Science & Technology Letters and ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering over the past 12 months.

A research study led by Nosang V. Myung, professor and department chair of chemical and environmental engineering in UCR’s Bourns College of Engineering has been named one of the “Top 10 Sustainable Chemistry Papers” in the June 6 edition of "Chemical and Engineering News." courtesy of Nosang V. Ayung

A research study led by Nosang V. Myung, professor and department chair of chemical and environmental engineering in UCR’s Bourns College of Engineering has been named one of the “Top 10 Sustainable Chemistry Papers” in the June 6 edition of “Chemical and Engineering News.”
courtesy of Nosang V. myung

Titled, “Tailored Synthesis of Photoactive TiO2 Nanofibers and Au/TiO2 Nanofiber Composites: Structure and Reactivity Optimization for Water Treatment Applications,” the paper was published in Environmental Science & Technology and describes the synthesis of nanofibers for water treatment and filtration. The lead author was Michael Nalbandian, who completed the work as a Ph.D. student in Myung’s lab.

Bryan M. Wong Receives Department of Energy Early Career Grant

Bryan M. Wong, an assistant professor of chemical and environmental engineering and materials science and engineering at UCR’s Bourns College of Engineering, has received a 2016 Early Career Research Program grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

An image of Bryan Wong working at a computer.

Assistant professor of chemical and environmental engineering and materials science and engineering at UCR.

Wong will receive $750,000 over the next five years to continue his research on developing new theoretical methods and algorithms to accurately understand the electronic properties of large chemical and material systems.

“The fundamental interactions between electrons and atoms have a profound effect on all materials used in modern technologies, and so understanding and predicting these complex interactions can provide a path forward in improving technologies ranging from light-harvesting solar cells, batteries, and consumer electronics,” Wong explained. “However, our current ability to calculate and predict these interactions is severely limited, even using modern supercomputers, due to the sheer complexity and number of equations that must be solved.”

The early career grant will help change that, supporting a detailed assessment of the importance of many-body quantum effects in large molecules and materials, Wong said.

Prior to joining UCR in 2014, Wong was an assistant professor at Drexel University in Philadelphia and a staff scientist at Sandia National Laboratories. He received his B.S. in physics and chemistry from Rice University and his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.). Read more on Wong.

Top of Page