Linda Navarrette, director of Project Moving Forward in UCR’s Graduate School of Education, participated in a panel discussion titled “Education Divide: Closing the Coachella Valley’s Achievement Gap,” at California State University, San Bernardino’s Palm Desert Campus on Wednesday, Sept. 14.

Hosted by the Desert Sun newspaper, the panel brought together educators, administrators, and community leaders from across the region to work collectively to help bridge the achievement gap that forms between different groups of students, with those from low income and minority families more likely to fall behind.

UC Riverside researcher Linda Navarrette (left) and Desert Sands Unified School District Assistant Superintendent Kathy Felci, speak as part of the Desert Sun Achievement Gap Forum. At far right is educational reporter Kristen Hwang moderating the panel. Omar Ornelas/The Desert Sun

UC Riverside researcher Linda Navarrette (left) and Desert Sands Unified School District Assistant Superintendent Kathy Felci, speak as part of the Desert Sun Achievement Gap Forum. At far right is educational reporter Kristen Hwang moderating the panel.
Omar Ornelas/The Desert Sun

In one of three sessions during the event, Navarrette joined Kathleen Felci, assistant superintendent at the Desert Sands Unified School District, to speak about how poverty, lack of opportunities, and educational initiatives impact language acquisition in the early years.

Navarrette a former teacher, psychologist, and administrator, is the creator of Project Moving Forward, an interactive vocabulary development program that is closing the education gap between English-learners and non-English-learners, advantaged and disadvantaged students. The program is being implemented in the Moreno Valley Unified School District as well as other school districts in California and across the United States.

U.S. Department of Education GAANN Award Will Help Prepare Students in Psychometrics

The Graduate School of Education (GSOE) at UC Riverside has been awarded $885,834 from the U.S. Department of Education’s Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) program. The grant, together with matching funds from UC Riverside, will support eight doctoral fellowships in educational psychology.

An image of Keith Widaman, a distinguished professor and associate dean (left) and Marsha Ing, an associate professor of educational psychology in UCR’s Graduate School of Education.

Keith Widaman, a distinguished professor and associate dean (left) and Marsha Ing, an associate professor of educational psychology in UCR’s Graduate School of Education.

The grant will fund students specializing in psychometrics, a field of study concerned with the science and techniques for measurement in psychology and education, including measures of attitudes, academic skills and knowledge, personality traits, and educational achievement. Psychometrics is a critical component of national efforts to improve educational outcomes.

GAANN fellowships, which last for up to three years, support outstanding students who qualify for financial assistance and are pursuing terminal degrees — typically the Ph.D.— in areas of national need. Keith Widaman, a distinguished professor and associate dean in the Graduate School of Education, applied for the funding with Marsha Ing, an associate professor of educational psychology. Read the full story.

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