Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scanner Delivered to UCR

The MRI machine, a high-end, research-grade system, is the first of its kind in the Inland Empire

Delivery of the “3 Tesla Siemens Prisma” Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine on Oct. 22, 2016. Photo by Michael Elderman

A 13-ton imaging scanner, which will be the centerpiece of UC Riverside’s new UCR Center for Advanced Neuroimaging (UCR CAN), was delivered and lowered into place by a crane on Saturday, Oct. 22.

The center will be near the psychology building on campus. It will house the “3 Tesla Siemens Prisma” Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine, a high-end, research-grade system, the first of its kind in the Inland Empire. The MRI scanner will allow UCR faculty to partake in cutting-edge research and answer diverse questions related to bioengineering, psychology and neuroscience, education and medicine, statistics and physics, and other areas.

Xiaoping Hu ucr file

Xiaoping Hu
ucr file

Looking into how the brain works, how we see, why we can smell, and how the brain functions differently when an individual is dealing with a mental illness, are a handful of topics that can now be the focus of research at UCR CAN.

Xiaoping Hu, professor of bioengineering and the director of UCR CAN, said the scanner will be available for researchers to use in mid-November.

“It will open up a new avenue for scholarly inquiry at UCR, putting UCR among the top players in neuroimaging and allowing basic and applied neuroscientists to probe the brain with greater details, sensitivity, and versatility,” Hu said. “As a campuswide resource, it will significantly facilitate collaborations across UCR, particularly among COE, CNAS, CHASS and SOM. We look forward to utilizing the MRI scanner to advance the science and engineering in related areas.”

For the next several weeks, the mechanical and electrical installation and machine testing will take place. A grand opening for UCR CAN will be held in January 2017. Details are forthcoming.

Psychology professors Christine Chiarello and Aaron Seitz, and Mike Pazzani, vice chancellor for Research and Economic Development, pose for a portrait as they look through the MRI scanner's patient tunnel. ucr

Psychology professors Christine Chiarello and Aaron Seitz, and Mike Pazzani, vice chancellor for Research and Economic Development, pose for a portrait as they look through the MRI scanner’s patient tunnel.
Photos by Michael Elderman

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