Frederick Hamann Leads New Research on Extremely Red Quasars

New research, led by Frederick Hamann, a professor at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at UCR, describes the discovery of a unique new population of extremely red quasars. The findings were recently published in the journal the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

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Frederick Hamann

The work by Hamann, combined with previous research by Hamann and others, describes the discovery of the new population of extremely red quasars detected in the Baryon Oscillation Sky Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS).

The extremely red quasars were selected for study because of their extreme color, but the analysis by Hamann and his fellow researchers reveal a number of peculiar properties consistent with a unique and possibly young evolutionary stage. In particular, they have an exceptionally high incidence of powerful quasar-driven outflows that could be involved in galaxy-wide blowouts of gas and dust.

Overall, the gaseous environments around the black holes appear to be more extended and more energetic than the environments of normal quasars, creating an exotic extreme variety of quasars.

The main goal of this study was to determine the size of the extremely red quasars population and characterize its basic properties compared to the much larger population of quasars in in the BOSS-SDSS survey overall.

Ann Cheney: Peer-led Services Ideal to Connect Student Veterans to Resources and Healthcare Services

About two-thirds of veterans using Veterans Affairs Department education benefits earn a degree or complete a certificate or training program. The remaining third drop out, however, overcome by challenges in transitioning from service member to student.

Ann Cheney

Ann Cheney

Now a study led by a health services researcher at UCR offers a solution: peer-led services, which, the researcher says, are ideal for connecting student veterans to resources and healthcare services.

Peer-led supportive services offer veterans a sense of community and have the potential to increase retention rates and help ensure academic success,” said Ann Cheney, an assistant professor in the Center for Healthy Communities in the School of Medicine and the lead author of the study that appears in the fall 2016 issue of Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action.

The study, initiated in 2013, was supported by the VA Office of Rural Health and the South Central VA Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center.

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