Research Study Makes the Case for Concrete Language for the Corner Office

The language used by CEOs can send a stock up or down.

When CEOs talk in less concrete terms, the stock price of their respective companies tends to suffer, according to a research study published in Strategic Management Journal by Professor Jerayr “John” Haleblian.

“The big takeaway was if CEOs used language that was more concrete as opposed to more abstract – the market responded more positively to the language,” said Haleblian, an associate dean and professor of management at the School of Business.

Haleblian’s research examined 500 firms from the S&P 1500 during the period of 2007-2013. The sample pool included more than 6,000 earnings calls. A computer program was used to parse through each transcript. The vocabulary – whether concrete or abstract – was compared to the performance of the company’s stock immediately after the call and one day later.

“Being transparent seems to pay off,” Haleblian said.

The paper was published in collaboration with researchers from Texas A&M University and Michigan State University.

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Researchers Create Next Generation of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

Cengiz Ozkan and Mihri Ozkan are developing the next generation of batteries.

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering have developed a technique to create high performance lithium-ion batteries utilizing sulfur and silicon electrodes. The batteries will extend the range of electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, while also providing more power with fewer charges to personal electronic devices such as cell phones and laptops.

The findings were published in an article titled, “Advanced Sulfur-Silicon Full Cell Architecture for Lithium Ion Batteries,” in the journal, Nature Scientific Reports. Cengiz Ozkan, professor of mechanical engineering, and Mihri Ozkan, professor of electrical and computer engineering, led the project.

-Richard Chang

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