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What Makes Kids With Autism Less Social Than Their Typically Developing Peers?

New research from UCR's Katherine Stavropoulos suggests kids with autism are less motivated to interact socially than their typically developing peers because they glean fewer rewards from such interactions.

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New research from UCR’s Katherine Stavropoulos suggests kids with autism are less motivated to interact socially than their typically developing peers because they glean fewer rewards from such interactions.

Photo credit: KatarzynaBialasiewicz via iStock

Description

New research from UCR's Katherine Stavropoulos suggests kids with autism are less motivated to interact socially than their typically developing peers because they glean fewer rewards from such interactions.