UCR Professor Posthumously Honored by the European Geosciences Union

The EGU Council decided to award Harry W. Green the medal posthumously at the 2018 EGU General Assembly, held April 8-13 in Vienna, Austria. Manuela Martins-Green, a professor of cell biology at UCR and Green’s widow, received the medal on his behalf.

The European Geosciences Union has awarded its 2018 Louis Néel Medal to Harry W. Green II for his seminal contributions to the mechanism of deep-focus earthquakes, rock rheology, mantle dynamics, and the dramatic improvement of a solid pressure-medium apparatus.

Green, a distinguished professor of geology and geophysics, died in September 2017, shortly after the Louis Néel Medal Committee had recommended him as a recipient. The EGU Council decided to award him the medal posthumously at the 2018 EGU General Assembly, held April 8-13 in Vienna, Austria. Manuela Martins-Green, a professor of cell biology at UCR and Green’s widow, received the medal on his behalf.

The Louis Néel Medal is awarded to individuals in recognition of outstanding achievements in rock magnetism, rock physics, and geomaterials.

Green earned his doctorate in 1968 at UCLA, where he worked with David T. Griggs, one of the fathers of rock mechanics. Green completed his postdoctoral work in the Division of Metallurgy and Materials Science at Case Western Reserve University. In 1970, he began a long career as a professor in the University of California System, first at Davis and then at Riverside.

Green was known worldwide for his contributions to the field of high-temperature/high pressure mineralogy and petrology. Read more about his work on the EGU website.

Sarah Nightingale

Researchers Recognized by Entomological Society of America

(Left to right) William Walton, professor of entomology, Alec Gerry, a cooperative extension specialist and professor of entomology.

The Pacific Branch of the Entomological Society of America has recognized two UCR professors for their service to the field.

William Walton, professor of entomology, will receive the Award for Excellence in Teaching. Walton’s group works on integrating studies of mosquito biology and ecology with the design of control methodologies for pestiferous and pathogen-transmitting mosquitoes in wetlands. As a teacher, his goal is to balance new developments in pedagogy and technology with a fundamental understanding of the subject matter.

Alec Gerry, a cooperative extension specialist and professor of entomology, is receiving the Medical, Urban and Veterinary Entomology Award. Gerry conducts research on pest arthropods and disease vectors that pose serious problems to animal agriculture, often resulting in substantial economic losses for producers.

The awards will be presented at the Pacific Branch meeting in Reno, Nevada, in June. The Pacific Branch received 31 nominations this year for 13 different awards. The winners were selected by a diverse group of 36 anonymous judges from the branch.

-Sarah Nightingale

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